Blog

11 February 2015

Owning a business is dream job

A recent survey has found that becoming a business owner is the fifth most popular dream job for UK workers.

A recent survey has found that becoming a business owner is the fifth most popular dream job for UK workers.

Solopress, a printing service, conducted a survey of 2,000 Britons and found that almost a quarter of workers lie about their jobs when asked what they do by others. The research suggests one of the reasons is because they would rather be doing a different job.

As part of the survey, respondents were asked to write their own ideal job a free text field. The top responses were:

  1. Pilot
  2. Footballer
  3. Writer, journalist or editor
  4. Doctor
  5. Business owner
  6. Teacher
  7. Actor
  8. Vet

There were of course other more unusual dream professions, such as a beer taster, bed tester and a chocolate maker. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the most hated professions were traffic wardens, sales people and call centre operators.

The main reason for lying about their jobs appears to be is insecurity. Workers want to look like they’ve achieved more than they have, or want to impress someone. Other reasons are to help them get a job or a promotion, or to avoid admitting failures, such as former business owners whose firms have folded. 

Men were likely to lie (25%) than women (under 20%), as were younger people.

Dissatisfaction with working for others

A survey by American Express last year found that half of workers would consider changing careers because they are so unhappy in their jobs. The most popular career change was to become a shop keeper; to run a bookshop tea shop or pub. This is despite the fact that many independent shop owners face pressure from larger chains and the demise of the traditional high street.

Much of the appeal of these professions is the fact that you can set your own schedule and be your own boss.

Another study conducted last month by Adzuna, a job search engine, found that just 3% of workers are completely satisfied with their current pay level. The survey of 1,000 workers covered salary satisfaction levels across more than 30 industries and discovered that 52% thought they were being underpaid for the work they do or the hours they work.

Therefore, while those who are self-employed generally earn less than employees, the research is stacking up that they are still happier than their counterparts.

If you employ workers, here are some tips for a motivated workforce and satisfied staff

D2 Interactive